Talking About The Bible

At our church we are about to release a series we are calling ‘Neighbour 2 Neighbour’. It’s encouraging and equipping members to talk about Jesus to the people the encounter during their day.

Here’s one of the first we’ve put together. What do you think?

What does the world say about the Bible?

Our secular culture does not hold much regard for God’s Word. There are many who would claim that the Bible is outdated, inaccurate, irrelevant, self-contradicting, and even fictional, and that it cannot be supported by logic.

In Western cultures, there has been a rise in a more overt atheism, mobilised to attack the Christian message in many areas, and most namely, the Scriptures. This influence has permeated popular culture. Along with a general decrease in knowledge of the Bible (compared with ages past), modern Australians tend to be suspicious of what the Bible has to say – even to the point of thinking the values it promotes are harmful to the Australian way of life.

What does the Bible say about itself?

The Bible claims to be God’s Word [2 Timothy 3:16]. It is living and active, able to speak to our hearts and change us [Hebrews 4:12]. It is written so that you may believe in Jesus and have life in Him [John 20:31].

The Bible points us to Jesus

Jesus is the fullest revelation of God [Colossians 1:15; Hebrews 1:1-3]. In Jesus, we see the Word who became one of us, full of grace and truth [John 1:1-18]. Jesus explained that the Old Testament (made up of the Law, the Prophets and the Psalms) pointed to and was fulfilled in Him [Luke 24:27,44]. In Jesus, we see all God’s promises finding their fulfilment [2 Corinthians 1:20].

The Bible claims to be historical

The Old Testament is an historical document containing narrative, cultural poetry, songs, wisdom for life, dialogue with God, and teachings about life with God, and prophecy; including promises about the coming Messiah and His age to come.

The New Testament Gospels claim to be historical biographies of Jesus’ life and ministry. For example, Luke’s opening statement demonstrates the carefulness and accuracy he used in researching who Jesus is and what He did [Luke 1:1-4]. The Gospels each record details about geography, political situations, and architectural descriptions that have been corroborated by centuries of archaeology and historical investigation. The rest of the New Testament documents likewise record real people, places, and events that mean we can read them with great historical confidence.

The Bible is understood by the Holy Spirit

Jesus promised the Holy Spirit to all who believe, and it is only through Him that we may truly know and understand the truth [John 14:17]. The Holy Spirit reveals the truth through the Bible. Even though the Bible makes the most sense of our human experience, it requires the Holy Spirit to overcome the prejudice of human sinfulness that rejects God’s Word.

What can we say about the Bible?

The Bible is Historically Reliable.

There are a variety of archaeological, geographical, and sociological details found in the Bible that have been found to be both accurate and verifiable even today. Especially concerning the New Testament, there are parallel accounts from Roman and Jewish historians that all help to confirm the reliability of details found in the Scriptures.

Discoveries over the past century have contributed enormously in demonstrating its reliability and accuracy in its preservation. This has been seen particularly in the comparison with the Old Testament documents and the Dead Sea Scrolls (discovered in a cave at Qumran in 1947).

The sheer quantity of fulfilled prophecy within the Bible’s pages speak for the reliability of God’s Word itself. God’s promises can be trusted, and His faithfulness is demonstrated page after page.

While we don’t have the original manuscripts that were directly inspired by God, we do have so many historically verifiable copies, that we can have total confidence that what we have today accurately reflects those original manuscripts. In fact, the authenticity of ancient biblical manuscripts surpasses all other ancient literature. The Bible transcends culture and language in such a way that it can be faithfully translated into any language with meaning and accuracy.

Australians desperately need the Bible!

If God really has revealed himself in such a way, then we ought to pay attention to it! Without this knowledge of God, we will never truly understand ourselves. We may be able to see the majesty and power of God through the created world, but we will never know God personally nor his redemption for us apart from His self-revelation in the Bible. Our deepest need is to know our Creator and Redeemer.

7 Things Biblical Submission Is Not

The following is an excerpt from a sermon  on 1Peter 3:1-7.
The full audio can be found here!

1. Submission is not only for women.

  • (Ephesians 6:1) Children must obey their parents in the Lord.
  • (Chapter 2:13) – Everyone, both men and women should submit themselves to every human authority.
  • (1Peter 2:18) The slave / master relationship, in modern day terms, is talking about the boss / employee submission.
  • (1Peter 2:21) Jesus humbled himself at multiple points, but washing the feet of his disciples is a great example, which of course foretells of his ultimate subjection to the cross.
  • (1Peter 3:7) It’s really important to see what Peter says about husbands in the passage we are dealing about here. He starts by saying “Husbands, in the same way” … This is a direct link back to Jesus’ example in chapter 2. If you wanted to amplify the wording here, you might say something like “In the same way that Jesus submitted to the Father’s will and suffered wounds for those he loved… so you should be selfless and caring toward your wives, considering her needs of more importance than your own.” Humbling oneself in submission is not just for women… if it was good enough for Jesus, it’s certainly good enough for all of us.
  • (1Peter 3:7) Peter tells husbands to be respectful of their wives. This means to honour and edify. To build up. In fact, the Greek word for respect here is a military word that denotes the honour which belongs to one who holds a position of rank or authority. That honour is granted based on a wife’s position as a co-heir in the gift of life.

2. Submission is not suggesting that the one who submits is in any way of less worth.

  • (1Peter 3:7) Peter tells husbands that their wives are co-heirs in Christ. He is making a very clear statement, that although there are, in general terms, unique physical and emotional features that separate men and women, they’re equally valuable in God’s sight. Men and women have the same worth and value in God’s sight.
    • They are equally elected.
    • Equally called.
    • Equally born-again.
    • Equally Justified.
    • Equally Adopted into God’s family.
    • They are equally made-perfect through Christ.
    • And in heaven they will be equally glorified by the Father’s graces.
  • Although men and women are distinct in their DNA… in their bodies… Peter is confirming what we all believe… that men and women are complete equal in God’s sight…

3. Submission is not being forced to agree on everything

  • (1Peter 3:1) As I already said, the reason Peter spends a bit more time on the role of women here is because she has had the courage to put her HOPE in Jesus Christ and her husband has not. This automatically suggests that submission does not mean you automatically have to forfeit your opinion or beliefs.

4. Submission is not putting the will of others before the will of Christ.

  • If Jesus is the example to follow, He never submitted to any human authority outside of the Father’s will. Submission is not putting the will of others before the will of Christ.
  • In fact, the exact opposite is true, in verse 1, Peter encourages people in submission to use their honorable character as a means of changing others. To win people without words. To convince people that God’s Word is true and worth following.

5. Submission does not mean avoiding the effort to influence or change others.

  • At every point we are to respectfully and faithfully try and be agents of change within our communities. We are to turn our wayward culture back towards the Creator who knows what’s best.

6. Submission is not females submitting to all men.

  • This passage is not talking about women submitting to males in general. It’s not talking about wives submitting to someone else’s husband. It’s not even talking about women submitting to a work boss or church leaders. It is clearly talking about one unique relationship, wives to their OWN HUSBANDS.

7. Submission does not mean acting and living in fear.

  • Look at verse 6. We are encouraged to not give way to fear. We’ll spend a bit of time on this particular point as we have a deeper look at biblical submission. But needless to say that biblical submission is never a fearful response to threats, manipulation or abuse.

Reach the City… Reach the World…

Tonight was a chance for everyone who serves at our church to get together and get the big idea of the upcoming terms series.

It was a collection of all different people from kids ministry workers, to youth leaders, music/worship teams, senior staff, bible study leaders, media teams and plenty more. About a hundred people came together and learned how we plan on sharing one big message over the next ten weeks to our entire church. I’m so encouraged that sharing about Jesus was at the centre of the night.

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The sermon series is ‘10 Cities God Loves‘. It’s shaping up to be a journey through Acts. Looking at how desperately in need of Jesus the cities of the first century are. It will show how desperately in need of Jesus that people are. How in need of Jesus I am. It will undoubtedly reveal the transforming power of the Gospel.

I am so excited to know that not only is this being taught on Sunday in church, but the kids, youth and young adults ministries are diving into the same message with similar material. Our mid-week bible studies, Sunday worship, seniors ministry are going to all experience a taste of this crucial message as well. Every member of our church, including some families with three generations, are going to hear the same message. That we are all in need of Jesus and by God’s grace He has chosen to use to share that message with our city… with our world.

Kids are: Disciples in training. Not disciples in waiting.

When I started working at Creek Road Presbyterian Church I was reluctant to enter kids ministry. I felt it was a long way from where I wanted to serve. I’m so glad that I gave it a shot. In fact I have found it to be a time of great growth in my own spiritual journey.

Last term I had a great opportunity to do a Kids Talk as a guest at a Korean Presbyterian Church in Brisbane. It was totally awesome to see such a great community of kids all meeting together and being overly enthusiastic about learning God’s Word.

The Pastor, Matthew Kim, while introducing me raised just his pinky finger and said “You are little disciples”. It was really encouraging that those kids are learning what it means to share their faith at such a young age. Encouraging them to share the gospel and training them for a lifetime of ministry. (Sorry QTC…)

This is a video that was shown at our church earlier this year, and it really speaks for itself.

The children that are in your life are the church of tomorrow. What are you doing to encourage them to be the spiritual leaders that they need to be? These children will be the ones who pass Christ’s church on to future generations.

For more information on this video, or similar resources check out http://www.wymad.org.uk/

Pride

Our church is holding a series on the 7 Deadly Sins this term. Looking over the kids church lesson for this week it dawned on me that we all struggle with sin, but just trying to shed sin might not be enough. What do we replace it with? Luckily for me my church kids ministry manual pointed me in the right direction. Read more Pride

ANZAC Day Address 2011

This is an ANZAC Day address that I was asked to present to a retirement village this year. It was a privilege to attend the ANZAC ceremony at Vele.

I enlisted in the Royal Australian Army Medical Corpse in 2006 and I am currently a student at Queensland Theological College studying to become a Padre to serve defence force personnel.

The 24th of April will mark the 96thanniversary since soldiers of the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps made their stamp on history. Read more ANZAC Day Address 2011